Colorado College Logo

  DigitalCC

Use AND (in capitals) to search multiple keywords.
Example: harmonica AND cobos

168 hits

  • Thumbnail for untitled
    untitled by unknown

    Unknown location. This song is not documented in the collection. Quality: Fair. PLEASE NOTE: This should be number 7 of 11 songs on audiofile.

  • Thumbnail for East Asian Ceramics:  Then and Now.  03,  Shino-ware Ewer
    East Asian Ceramics: Then and Now. 03, Shino-ware Ewer by unknown

    Shino-ware was associated with kilns of the Mino district, near Tajimi in Gifu prefecture, central Honshu, north of Nagoya and Seto. Shino-ware is characterized by its glaze, which is known simply as Shino. It is usually a thick white glaze with a soft lustrous surface, neither matte nor glossy, and a surprising sense of tactile softness to the touch. Often, on the rim or other ridges of a form, the color will break to a warm orangish color, hinting at a sense of the clay body under the glaze (or it may suggest other images, as with the rim of Mrs. Ota's tea bowl in the Kawabata novel, Thousand Cranes). It is a subtle and rich glaze, one much favored by masters of tea. Often, but not always, designs were painted on the surface of pieces before they were glazed. These patterns, painted with an iron slip or pigment, are partially obscured and softened by the glaze over them, creating both a quiet subtlety of design and a sense of depth to the glazed surface. -- An aside about this particular piece is the difference in color of the lid of the ewer and the body of the ewer, proper, suggesting that perhaps the pieces were fired apart from one another and that, even if they were immediately side by side in the kiln, the atmosphere in the kiln (the amount of smokiness or clarity of flame) was slightly different around each of the two pieces. A problem that will be recognized by all potters, today, just as then. -- Russell Tyson Purchase Fund Income, 1966.332

  • Thumbnail for Japanese ceramics:  Tea leaf storage jar, Bizen ware.
    Japanese ceramics: Tea leaf storage jar, Bizen ware. by unknown

    Tea leaf storage jar, of modest size (perhaps 12" tall) but strongly articulated as a form. Unglazed stoneware with strong fire markings, characteristic of Bizen ware. Rice straw soaked in sea water salt brine was draped across the form as it was placed in the kiln; at the peak temperatures of the firing, the salt brine would volatilize and combine with the silica in the clay to form an "accidental" natural glaze. This procedure probably was followed initially as a means to keep pieces from fusing to one another in the firing, by separating them with high silica content rice straw, but with the discovery of the result of soaking the straw in brine, it became a frequent decorative technique on Bizen ware. Museum Purchase B67P10

  • Thumbnail for Korean Ceramics:  Stand with a jar.
    Korean Ceramics: Stand with a jar. by unknown

    Stoneware jar on a stand, from the ancient region of Gaya in Korea. The stand accommodates the jar, which is round bottomed and could not stand on its own. The piercing of the stand base is probably visual, rather than being designed to serve a particular purpose. The side of the jar shows natural glazing, in the form of wood ash from the kiln fire that settled on the shoulder of the piece and fused with silica in the clay to create a natural, "accidental" glaze. (Gift of Juliet Boone, 1991.150.a-.b )

  • Thumbnail for Korean Ceramics:  Porcelain Jar.
    Korean Ceramics: Porcelain Jar. by unknown

    Large spherical jar of the sort known as a "Moon" jar. The museum label comments, these jars "...were loved by Korean people not only because of their white color, which was suggestive of Confucian virtues, but also because the form was thought to represent the fertility and gentle, embracing qualities associated with women during the Joseon dynasty." This example presents an interesting comparison with the jar presented in file ecasia000358, another "Moon" jar from the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. The one in Chicago has a more matte glaze surface, while this one has a transparent glaze. The difference in the glaze may be the result of placement in different locations in a kiln, with the matte surface possibly resulting from a slightly cooler temperature and the transparent glaze from a slightly higher temperature, as might result at the different ends of a tube kiln. (The Avery Brundage collection, B60P110+ )

  • Thumbnail for After Hiroshige, front view stage 1
    After Hiroshige, front view stage 1 by unknown

    One of nineteen prints which illustrate the process of making a multi-block multicolor woodblock print.The print reproduced is the view of Asakusa Kinryuzan (Asakusa Kannon Temple) from Ando Hiroshige’s Toto yukimi hakkei (Eight Views of Snow in the Eastern Capital).

  • Thumbnail for After Hiroshige, front view stage 3
    After Hiroshige, front view stage 3 by unknown

    One of nineteen prints which illustrate the process of making a multi-block multicolor woodblock print.The print reproduced is the view of Asakusa Kinryuzan (Asakusa Kannon Temple) from Ando Hiroshige’s Toto yukimi hakkei (Eight Views of Snow in the Eastern Capital).

  • Thumbnail for Fan painting - Calligraphy on round fan
    Fan painting - Calligraphy on round fan by Unknown

    Seven lines of running script on a round fan, followed by a single line with the dedication and signature, which is unclear. This is an attractive example of the running script, by a writer who confidently and quickly wrote out this piece. There are some curious inconsistencies in the scale of characters, some being very small and other quite large. The distinctive cipher that is the signature should be able to be identified at some later date.

  • Thumbnail for Fan painting - Calligraphy on round fan
    Fan painting - Calligraphy on round fan by Unknown

    An ovoid shaped fan filled with ten lines of running script, followed by a single line with signature. The calligraphy in this example is particularly attractive. It was written with a smooth rhythm, and each character is given an appropriate weight in the line. Within each character, the individual strokes are also well arranged. Such features cannot come from considered planning as each stroke is made, but can be had only through long practice.

  • Thumbnail for Tsongkhapa on a tiger (Thangka)
    Tsongkhapa on a tiger (Thangka) by Unknown

    Ground mineral pigment on cotton, silk, 49-1/2 (L) x 29 (W) inches. Je Tsongkhapa, c. 1357-1419 is revered as a manifestation of Manjushri, the god of wisdom, founder of the Galugpa or Yellow Hat sect, and a proponent of the Kadampa school of Buddhism. The tiger is sometimes shown as his vahana (vehicle), indicatin gTsongkhapa's ability to control the tiger-like bodily senses. he holds a skull in his left hand and a flaming sword in his right. At the top left is the 3rd Panchen Lama (Yontenod Palden Yoshe) and at the right is the philosopher-sage Nagarjuna. along the bottom, left to right, are Jedung Lozang Palden, Mahakala and Asanga.