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2 hits

  • Thumbnail for Spring in a Hot Spring
    Spring in a Hot Spring by Yoshida, Hiroshi (1876-1950)

    Woodblock print, 9.75 x 14.5 inches. Cherry blossoms in early spring in the foreground, a bridge over a stream with figures and buildings, and in the background a spa,trees, and mountains - all in delicate muted green, pink and brown. The artist captures what, for any Japanese person, is a nostalgic moment in an ideal setting. Unseen here are clouds of war gathering. Hiroshi was historically the most important artist in the Yoshida family. About 1900 and following, Americans bought many of his watercolors and, after the war, many of his prints. Yoshida Hiroshi is a second generation Yoshida family artist, who established the Yoshida Studio in Tokyo. The Yoshida family of artists began with Yoshida Kasaburô (1861-1894), then next Yoshida Hiroshi (1876-1950) and his wife Fujio (1887-1987), then their sons Toshi (1911-1995) with his wife Kiso (1919-2005) and Hodaka (1926-1995) with his wife Chizuko (1924- ) and daughter Ayomi (1958- ).

  • Thumbnail for Cherry Tree in Kawagoe
    Cherry Tree in Kawagoe by Yoshida, Hiroshi (1876-1950)

    16 x 11 inches. Woodcut relief print. Figures in foreground; purple, brown and orange village and background. Posthumously printed by Toshi Yoshida, Hiroshi’s eldest son and heir to studio. It shows cherry blossoms and figures in fr ont of a Buddhist structure and bridge on the outskirts of Tokyo. Hiroshi was a very important oil painter, watercolorist, and woodblock artist. His style has been called "Romantic Realism." He would portray a scene in nature, usually in Japan but also in the United States, in a light that would evoke deep feelings in the viewer. Within the shin hanga, or new print movement, his work is distinct. Some of his most admired prints have long been out of print. Toshi, his son, used Hiroshi's same woodblocks and pigments to print new editions of these works, this print being example. Hiroshi was the leading second generation artist in the Yoshida family.