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4 hits

  • Thumbnail for Adkisson, Rob
    Adkisson, Rob by Wallace, Andrew

    Rob Adkisson came to Colorado College from Dallas, Texas, and attended from 1988 through 1992. He was interviewed for the LGBT Oral History project during his visit for homecoming weekend on October 15, 2011.

  • Thumbnail for Jeffries, Karl
    Jeffries, Karl by Wallace, Andrew

    Karl Jeffries came to Colorado College from a small town in Southern Colorado in 1987 and graduated in 1991. He was diagnosed with HIV shortly after graduation and now lives in Berkeley, California with his partner and two kids. Karl was interviewed for the LGBT Oral History project during his visit for homecoming weekend on October 16, 2011.

  • Thumbnail for Morgan, Ginger
    Morgan, Ginger by Wallace, Andrew

    Virginia “Ginger” Morgan graduated from Colorado College in 1986. She received Masters in Theological Studies from Vanderbilt. She was Assistant Director of Admission at Colorado College from 1987-1990, Associate Chaplain (and Acting Chaplain) from 1990-2005, and Associate Dean of Students 2005-2012. She was interviewed for the LGBT Oral History project on May 17 2012.

  • Thumbnail for The gravity of Albuquerque : the San Juan-Chama Diversion Project and the transformation of the American West
    The gravity of Albuquerque : the San Juan-Chama Diversion Project and the transformation of the American West by Wallace, Andrew

    The San Juan-Chama Diversion Project (SJCDP) is a federal irrigation infrastructure project that transports 96,200 acre-feet of Upper Colorado River basin water from the San Juan River in Southern Colorado to the Chama River in Northern New Mexico through mountain and desert via a network of tunnels, pipes, and canals. While some of this water is used for municipal and agricultural purposes throughout Middle Rio Grande communities, the majority of this water was purchased by the city of Albuquerque for municipal and industrial uses. This paper uses this, and associated projects (Navajo Indian Irrigation Project) to explore the connections and tensions between the law, people and the environment in the development of the American West, and New Mexico in particular.