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  • Thumbnail for Fruits of your neighbor : an economic geography of agricultural innovation
    Fruits of your neighbor : an economic geography of agricultural innovation by Stiller-Shulman, Alex Julian

    Diffusion of new knowledge and technologies in agriculture can offset the sometimes explosive nature of food price increases, especially in developing countries. Closely following the notion of innovative geographic clusters, this thesis examines knowledge flows in the US agriculture industry for evidence of innovative agglomeration. Each agricultural patent granted from 1972 - 2002 was spatially tagged using Geographic Information Systems software. The data indicate that a closer distance between any two patent origins increases the probability that one cites the other as prior art, with subtle interregional variations on the degree to which proximity advances agricultural innovation. Policies that exploit the relative ease of knowledge within localized networks can encourage development of cost-cutting technologies which can in turn lower world food prices.

  • Thumbnail for Fruits of their neighbors : the role of geography in agricultural innovation
    Fruits of their neighbors : the role of geography in agricultural innovation by Lybecker, Kristina M. , Johnson, Daniel K. N. , Stiller-Shulman, Alex Julian

    Closely following the notion of innovative geographic clusters, this paper examines knowledge flows in the US agriculture industry for evidence of innovative agglomeration. The data indicate that a closer distance between any two agricultural patent origins increases the probability that one cites the other as prior art. Further, subtle interregional variations characterize the degree to which proximity advances agricultural innovation. Finally, the results show that older innovations in agriculture proliferate more readily than recently created knowledge.

  • Thumbnail for The NWIMBY effect (no Walmart in my backyard) : big box stores and residential property values
    The NWIMBY effect (no Walmart in my backyard) : big box stores and residential property values by Lybecker, Kristina M. , Gurley, Nicole , Johnson, Daniel K. N. , Stiller-Shulman, Alex , Fischer, Stephen

    Recent Wal-Mart openings have been accompanied by public demonstrations against the company’s presence in the community, asserting (among other things) that their presence is deleterious to residential property values. This study empirically evaluates that claim, analyzing the spatial correlation between Wal-Mart locations and residential property values, while comparing Wal-Mart with other big-box retailers for a frame of reference and controlling for other important aspects of a home’s market value. We recognize that market value may represent a trade-off between price and patience, so perform a similar analysis using a property’s days on the market to evaluate any big-box effect. Finally, we interpret the resulting effects in two ways, from both the resident’s and retailer’s point of view, casting new light on the NWIMBY effect.