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2018-2019

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  • Thumbnail for DCC Test Thesis
  • Thumbnail for From The Breakfast Club to Boyhood: A Content Analysis of Rape Culture Perpetuation in Coming of Age Films, 1980s to Today
    From The Breakfast Club to Boyhood: A Content Analysis of Rape Culture Perpetuation in Coming of Age Films, 1980s to Today by Chippari, Julia

    Twenty of the most popular coming of age films, five from each decade, 1980s-2010s, have been analyzed for perpetuation of rape culture and rape myth acceptance. This study examines the frequencies and types of perpetuation present in each film. The analysis is based on a widely accepted rape myth acceptance scale (RMA) and a list of other subtler rape culture perpetuations. The films received a point for each scene that fulfilled the sentiments in the RMA or subtler perpetuation list. The films were analyzed in terms of the decade they were released in to find patterns in rape culture over time. Overall, the amount of rape culture perpetuation decreased from each previous decade, with the 2010s films having the least amount of perpetuation. While the overall amount of perpetuation has seemingly decreased over time, there has been a potentially dangerous spike in the number of subtler scenes that normalize and perpetuate rape culture.

  • Thumbnail for The Trump Paradox: Analyzing the 2016 Hispanic Electorate’s Voting Behavior
    The Trump Paradox: Analyzing the 2016 Hispanic Electorate’s Voting Behavior by Mendez, Miguel

    About a third of Hispanic voters in the past have supported republican candidates in presidential elections, but this figure stayed consistent at 35% in the 2016 election despite candidate Trump’s anti-immigrant rhetoric. This research seeks to understand why certain Hispanic voters preferred Trump over Clinton. Research was conducted by analyzing the Hispanic population from the 2016 Cooperative Congressional Election Survey through logistic regressions to determine the likelihood that different variables had in determining who people voted for in the election. Ultimately, this study found that older, more religious Hispanics that had strong attitudes towards immigration were the most likely to vote for Trump.