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A Comparative Study: Tucson, AZ and Colorado Springs, CO Discrimination of Intersectional Identities

by Alvarado, Audriana Santana

Abstract

Discrimination comes in many forms especially amongst intersectional identifying people. This study focuses on the different types of discrimination that native Spanish- speaking women workers face often in Tucson, Arizona and Colorado Springs. This comparative study discusses and explores the idea of how distance from the U.S./Mexico Border plays a role in the types of discrimination these women face. Some common types of discrimination encountered include: racism, colorism, sexism, classism, and discrimination based on language fluency and/or pronunciation. Distance plays a large factor in shaping political and social cultures of Tucson, Arizona and Colorado Springs. The results show that in Tucson, Arizona, due to its closeness to the Border, there are many more Spanish-speakers and there are clear legal policies that particularly target Spanish-speaking populations. Meanwhile in Colorado Springs, there are lower percentages of Spanish-speaking populations, therefore, the discrimination can be much stronger since some people may not be accustomed to hearing Spanish being spoken, or sometimes not as strong as in Tucson because there are not as many laws directly targeted towards these populations since Colorado Springs is further from the Border. That’s not to say it doesn’t exist, because it is clear that social culture and media both target Spanish-speaking populations more often than laws in Colorado Springs. Both cities’ social and political cultures strongly impact the types of discrimination these women face in this study.

Note

The author has given permission for this work to be deposited in the Digital Archive of Colorado College.

Colorado College Honor Code upheld.

Includes bibliographical references.

Administrative Notes

The author has given permission for this work to be deposited in the Digital Archive of Colorado College.

Colorado College Honor Code upheld.

Copyright
Copyright restrictions apply.
Publisher
Colorado College Tutt Library
PID
coccc:30039
Digital Origin
born digital
Extent
36 pages : illustrations, map(s)
Thesis
Senior Thesis -- Colorado College
Thesis Advisor
Christina Leza Mario Montano
Department/Program
Anthropology
Degree Name
Bachelor of Arts
Degree Type
bachelor
Degree Grantor
Colorado College Tutt Library
Date Issued
2018-05