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2017-2018

7 hits

  • Thumbnail for A Comparative Study: Tucson, AZ and Colorado Springs, CO Discrimination of Intersectional Identities
    A Comparative Study: Tucson, AZ and Colorado Springs, CO Discrimination of Intersectional Identities by Alvarado, Audriana Santana

    Discrimination comes in many forms especially amongst intersectional identifying people. This study focuses on the different types of discrimination that native Spanish- speaking women workers face often in Tucson, Arizona and Colorado Springs. This comparative study discusses and explores the idea of how distance from the U.S./Mexico Border plays a role in the types of discrimination these women face. Some common types of discrimination encountered include: racism, colorism, sexism, classism, and discrimination based on language fluency and/or pronunciation. Distance plays a large factor in shaping political and social cultures of Tucson, Arizona and Colorado Springs. The results show that in Tucson, Arizona, due to its closeness to the Border, there are many more Spanish-speakers and there are clear legal policies that particularly target Spanish-speaking populations. Meanwhile in Colorado Springs, there are lower percentages of Spanish-speaking populations, therefore, the discrimination can be much stronger since some people may not be accustomed to hearing Spanish being spoken, or sometimes not as strong as in Tucson because there are not as many laws directly targeted towards these populations since Colorado Springs is further from the Border. That’s not to say it doesn’t exist, because it is clear that social culture and media both target Spanish-speaking populations more often than laws in Colorado Springs. Both cities’ social and political cultures strongly impact the types of discrimination these women face in this study.

  • Thumbnail for An Intellectual History of Women Anthropologists: Background, Methods, Ethnography
    An Intellectual History of Women Anthropologists: Background, Methods, Ethnography by Wuerth, Kendra

    This research studies women anthropologists to discern the ways in which these women challenged the anthropological paradigms that were set in place prior to women's emergence into the field. This study will help the reader understand to what extent these women have shaped the previously male dominated field of cultural anthropology from as as the late 1800's to present day.

  • Thumbnail for Reframing Palestine: Misconceptions and American Jewish-Muslim Solidarity
    Reframing Palestine: Misconceptions and American Jewish-Muslim Solidarity by Mintz, Rachel

    This project studies the impact of discourse surrounding the Israeli occupation of Palestine on American Jewish-Muslim solidarity efforts. The author uses a Muslim-Jewish dialogue that took place between 2001 and 2014, the Muslim-Jewish Bridge Building Group (MJBBG), as a case study, conducting interviews with former participants and facilitators. The data demonstrates that the entanglement of Jewish and Muslim religious identities with the political Palestinian is an impediment to addressing the root cause of Jewish-Muslim tension in the United States. The author suggests that this problematic reframing be addressed at the beginning of American Muslim-Jewish solidarity efforts in order to dispel misplaced tension and dismantle the xenophobic project of equating Islam and Palestinians, Jews and Zionists.

  • Thumbnail for The Commodification and Appropriation of Ethnomedicine: Examining Ecuador's Indigenous Medicinal Traditions through the lens of the Indigenous Revitalization Movement
    The Commodification and Appropriation of Ethnomedicine: Examining Ecuador's Indigenous Medicinal Traditions through the lens of the Indigenous Revitalization Movement by Hegg, Caitlin

    A historical examination of the indigenous revitalization movement occurring throughout Ecuador demonstrates how advocacy for indigenous activism has increased indigenous pride. This has led to the reclaiming of cultural practices and traditions once common in the mazeways of society but that have lost prevalence due to the effects of acculturation and westernization. Ethnomedicine, or the traditional medicinal practices, rituals, and remedies of indigenous cultures, is one such tradition that is being increasingly common due to the revitalization movement. The commodification and sale of ethnomedicine in western-style pharmacies and integration into intercultural healthcare clinics has allowed urban indigenous and mestizo populations to reclaim their cultural practices and medicines, and represents one way in which urban Ecuadorians are navigating maintaining their traditional culture while adapting to globalization and ongoing effects of colonialism. However, this commodification and increased popularity of ethnomedicine has simultaneously led to increased appropriation of ethnomedicine by whites and other non-indigenous peoples, which is problematic and an issue Ecuador will need to address moving forward.

  • Thumbnail for The Slate Pencil: A Case for Behavioral Theory and the Life History Model in Historical Archaeology
  • Thumbnail for The Value of Incorporating Anthropology into Chronic Illness Treatment in the United States with an Analysis of Heart Disease
    The Value of Incorporating Anthropology into Chronic Illness Treatment in the United States with an Analysis of Heart Disease by Loper, Ayla

    The United States spends more money than any other high-income country on healthcare but has poorer outcomes in key healthcare measures. Integrating holistic anthropological theories and tools such as ethnography or evolutionary approaches can help medical practitioners deliver more effective care when faced with pressures and difficulties that occur when operating in the United States healthcare system. This incorporation of anthropology with biomedical care is specifically pertinent to chronic disease treatment. Here, I suggest anthropological theories and tools to improve the treatment of chronic illnesses. At the end of the theoretical discussion, I examine these issues with a focus on heart disease. Heart disease treatment in the United States is an example of a disease that could benefit greatly from the employment of an anthropological lens. I found that heart disease treatment in the United States does not cater treatment to individual cases or consider a variety of factors, even though heart disease commonly involves lifestyle factors.

  • Thumbnail for When Words Fail: A Study of Language, Gender, and American Stereotypes
    When Words Fail: A Study of Language, Gender, and American Stereotypes by Frederiksen, Rowan

    This project looks at the gendered stereotypes that are projected on to males and females in the United States and how these stereotypes affect our language and speech. Students at Colorado College participated in a series of activities, free-listing and pile-sorting, to gather data on the association of everyday terms to masculinity and femininity. A common trend that appeared among the participants was the acknowledgement of gendered terms and the discomfort that came with this acknowledgement. This trend supports the gendered language that has been created within American society and the idea of toughness vs. passiveness in males and females respectively.