Colorado College Logo

  DigitalCC

Use AND (in capitals) to search multiple keywords.
Example: harmonica AND cobos

2016-2017

15 hits

  • Thumbnail for  Taking the Heat: How Women Firefighters Navigate a Gendered Workplace
    Taking the Heat: How Women Firefighters Navigate a Gendered Workplace by Holzman, Nicole

    The fire service is rooted in gender roles; there is a long history of a machismo atmosphere, in which the recent addition of women disrupts. This study examined women firefighters experiences in a male dominated workplace. This study focused on 1) how women firefighters reach balanced assimilation, 2) how women interpret behaviors/practices as gendered, 3) how women reframe the embodiment of the male gaze, and 4) how women “do gender” on and off stage. Through a qualitative methods approach, I interviewed 19 women firefighters across the United States. Findings suggest that gender performances change based on the audience/stage. Additionally, I argue how women remain in a period of cultural assimilation, in which they act according to stereotypical behavior, in efforts to reach balanced assimilation.

  • Thumbnail for "It's Our Honor to to Walk Them Through This Journey": Hospice Workers and How They Conceptualize Their Work and the Dying Process
    "It's Our Honor to to Walk Them Through This Journey": Hospice Workers and How They Conceptualize Their Work and the Dying Process by Jacobson, Eliza Grace

    This research aims to understand how hospice workers conceptualize their jobs and the dying process in a death phobic society, and a medical field where extending life is almost always the primary goal. I used Everett Hughes’ theory of dirty work to examine how hospice employees construct meaning of their occupations. I conducted 10 in-depth face-to-face interviews with certified nursing assistants, nurses, physician assistants, social workers, and administrators. I found that that these hospice workers contextualize their work as being more rewarding than other areas of treatment through a patient driven practice that empowers the dying to have agency over their end-of-life experiences. They also frame their work as either a calling or a natural ability, seeing their work as an honor and a source of insight into both life and death.

  • Thumbnail for "Music Is All We Got" Authenticity and Commodification: A Content Analysis of Hip-Hop Lyricism
    "Music Is All We Got" Authenticity and Commodification: A Content Analysis of Hip-Hop Lyricism by Springer, Sherman

    Hip-hop is an American subculture which has seen exceptional popularity and commodification since its conception. The original purpose of hip-hop was to address the conditions which lead to its necessity: poverty, racial inequality, and gang activity. However, hegemonic assimilation and commodification of subcultural practices has accelerated with the rise of internet technology, stripping subcultures of their symbolic value and replacing it with monetary gain. The domination of popular media by sensationalized pop rap is a manifestation of the declining symbolic integrity and authenticity of hip-hop in dominant American culture. I conduct lyrical content analysis of six popular rap artists in order to determine how hegemonic commodification of subcultures such as hip-hop influences the ability of artists to maintain authentic to what hip-hop has stood for historically. This research seeks to compare the symbolic trajectories of these artists in order to distinguish authentic artists from the inauthentic, and furthermore understand the interplay between authenticity and commodification in hip-hop.

  • Thumbnail for "They Told Me I Was Pregnant": The Intersection of Quality, Satisfaction and Reputation at a Campus Health Clinic
    "They Told Me I Was Pregnant": The Intersection of Quality, Satisfaction and Reputation at a Campus Health Clinic by Lubchenco, Cora

    Patient satisfaction is regarded as a health outcome goal and an indicator of care quality; however, sociological factors can influence patients irrespective of service quality, potentially disconnecting the medical encounter from the report of satisfaction. This study considered the poor long-term reputation of Boettcher Health Center at Colorado College as an opportunity for: 1) quantifying quality ratings and satisfaction levels, 2) insight into the clinic’s reputation, and 3) suggestions for aligning quality, satisfaction and reputation. An online survey of 700 students found that overall quality ratings were above average for all services and satisfaction levels were above 50 percent for all healthcare goals, while respondents’ written responses were mostly negative. Statistical analyses revealed significant effects of race, income, insurance type and parental involvement upon quality ratings and satisfaction. This study has implications for understanding liberal arts college students as a unique patient demographic which may be suspicious of healthcare services due to the likelihood of having been raised in an upper-class family.

  • Thumbnail for A Case Study of the Constraints to Diversify a Student Body at a Small Liberal Arts College
    A Case Study of the Constraints to Diversify a Student Body at a Small Liberal Arts College

    This paper explores the modern and annual constraints that small, liberal arts institutions face when attempting to create a diverse student body. Research suggests that institutions have historically employed recruiting programs that were biased against certain underprivileged and minority populations, creating an overtly homogenized campus as a result. This case study highlights the tools that Colorado College employs, (or has re-developed) in response to the societal demand for diversity in higher education. Using a largely qualitative approach, eleven individuals with major positions in either the Colorado College Office of Admissions or other roles in student life were interviewed. Messaging tools such as pamphlets, campus tours and prospective student information sessions were also examined. Results indicate that incorporation of more diversity requires 1) contextualization, 2) rationalization and 3) greater capital spending.

  • Thumbnail for Anti-Immigration Attitudes in Europe: A Multilevel Analysis
    Anti-Immigration Attitudes in Europe: A Multilevel Analysis by Szymanska, Karolina Ada

    This paper examines attitudes towards immigration in 19 European countries. Situated within a societal context of rising right-wing populist governments and the constituents that voted them into office, this study explores the degree of influence individual and country level characteristics have on attitudes towards immigration in Europe. Data from the European Social Survey 2014 was used at the first, individual level of analysis. Data from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s 2011-2012 Factbook was used at the second, country level of analysis. Using multilevel modelling techniques, a hierarchical linear model with random intercept and country level covariates was produced, followed by an analysis of ranked country effects. The findings demonstrate that individual level variables are much more important when it comes to determining anti-immigration attitudes, and that Central European countries tend to display more negative attitudes, while Nordic and Western countries show more positive outlooks on immigration.

  • Thumbnail for Building Community Resilience to Natural Hazards: Corporate Disaster Planning as a Form of Corporate Social Responsibility and Social Capital in Metro Manila, Philippines
    Building Community Resilience to Natural Hazards: Corporate Disaster Planning as a Form of Corporate Social Responsibility and Social Capital in Metro Manila, Philippines by Buika, Pelemarie

    This study examines a fairly new corporate emphasis on using disaster management planning as a form of corporate social responsibility and as a vehicle for further strengthening social capital at the community level with the goal of creating community resilience to natural hazards. This corporate effort is very strong in the Metro Manila, Philippines. Through literature research and expert-opinion interview data collected, analysis of my data suggests that disaster management planning strengthens community resilience through three types of social capital: 1) bonding social capital at the family and community level; 2) bridging social capital that horizontally engages many sectors of society in common disaster planning activities, to include corporate-to-community partnerships; and 3) linking social capital that has empowered individuals and local barangay communities through the authority and funding vested in them by the strong national disaster risk reduction and management law. My research and findings suggest that corporate involvement in disaster management planning is an effective form of corporate social responsibility and that corporate disaster planning does lead to improved social capital that strengthens community resilience.

  • Thumbnail for Can You Adopt A Chinese Identity?: Identity Conflict In Chinese Adoptees
    Can You Adopt A Chinese Identity?: Identity Conflict In Chinese Adoptees by Smukler, Emiko Chunjing

    When examining racial and ethnic identity, transracial adoptees are a relevant population to study because they are confronted with the paradox of having grown up in a white family and community, typically having been treated as an honorary white (Tuan 1998), but being perceived by others outside of these milieus as an ethnic and racial minority (Lee 2003). The circumstances of Chinese adoptees raise the following questions: 1) what factors influence the development of a racial-ethnic identity, 2) how do adoptees decide whether or not to pursue ethnic exploration, and 3) how do adoptees negotiate identity conflict when external perceptions are inconsistent with their internalized self-perceptions? Through the narratives of 11 Chinese adoptees, the present study explores the lived experiences of Chinese adoptees in their identity development, the identity conflicts many encounter, and how adoptees navigate such conflict. Findings indicate that how adoptees dealt with this conflict was influenced by their early exposure to other Asians and Chinese adoptees and their awareness of being Chinese growing up. As young adults, participants either distanced themselves from other Asians or explored their ethnic identity, which led to an increased recognition of their Chinese identity. Exploration included taking classes or studying abroad, increased interactions with Asians or people of color, or by discussing racial differences with friends.

  • Thumbnail for Emerging From the Beaten Path: Trajectories to Adulthood Following an Elite Education
    Emerging From the Beaten Path: Trajectories to Adulthood Following an Elite Education by Holt, Anna

    Over the past century, the normative transition to adulthood has shifted in tandem with marked sociopolitical shifts in American society. Jeffrey Arnett’s (2000; 2015) Emerging Adulthood theory proposes a new developmental phase in the life course characterized by identity exploration, instability, self-investment, ambiguous identity with adulthood, and optimism regarding the future. Research suggests that Emerging Adulthood reflects more closely the experience of those who attend college than those who do not, but questions remain regarding potential differences in transitional trajectories within highly educated groups. This study seeks to investigate the possibility that Emerging Adulthood is not universal among college students, and collected data from 175 traditional-aged graduating seniors at an elite liberal arts school. The findings indicate that the transitional trajectories experienced and anticipated by wealthy students and white students in this sample were closer to Emerging Adulthood than those of less wealthy students and students of color.

  • Thumbnail for Emerging From the Beaten Path: Trajectories to Adulthood Following an Elite Education
    Emerging From the Beaten Path: Trajectories to Adulthood Following an Elite Education by Holt, Anna

    Over the past century, the normative transition to adulthood has shifted in tandem with marked sociopolitical shifts in American society. Jeffrey Arnett’s (2000; 2015) Emerging Adulthood theory proposes a new developmental phase in the life course characterized by identity exploration, instability, self-investment, ambiguous identity with adulthood, and optimism regarding the future. Research suggests that Emerging Adulthood reflects more closely the experience of those who attend college than those who do not, but questions remain regarding potential differences in transitional trajectories within highly educated groups. This study seeks to investigate the possibility that Emerging Adulthood is not universal among college students, and collected data from 175 traditional-aged graduating seniors at an elite liberal arts school. The findings indicate that the transitional trajectories experienced and anticipated by wealthy students and white students in this sample were closer to Emerging Adulthood than those of less wealthy students and students of color.

  • Thumbnail for It's Not Just About Food: Empowering Participants Through an Alternative Food Security Program
    It's Not Just About Food: Empowering Participants Through an Alternative Food Security Program by Perlick, Madison Rose

    American conservatism renounces the structural inequalities that lead to widespread poverty and instead proclaims that welfare recipients depend on the state due to poor personal decisions that land them in a state of poverty. Literature on hunger assistance services shows that this prevailing view of poverty and hunger as an individual issue has created a stigma and sense of shame around participating in hunger assistance services. However, current studies on hunger acknowledge that widespread food insecurity is a symptom of larger structural inequalities and explore how to incorporate empowerment theory into hunger assistance services. Limited research exists on the capacity to empower participants through hunger assistance services, especially alternative food security programs, such as community gardens, community kitchens, and food rescue programs. Scholars in this field call for more research that evaluates existing hunger assistance programs through the lens of empowerment theory. I address this gap in the literature through a community-based, qualitative study that explores the capacity of one alternative food security program to empower participants. I suggest here that alternative hunger assistance services have the capacity to empower individuals and communities through a participatory structure, the facilitation of social capital, and the reframing of hunger and poverty as social justice issues rather than individual problems.

  • Thumbnail for Maybe It’s Just Different with Girls: A Social Ecological Analysis of Intimate Partner Violence in Female-on-Female Relationships
    Maybe It’s Just Different with Girls: A Social Ecological Analysis of Intimate Partner Violence in Female-on-Female Relationships by Register, Sophie Evelyn

    Using a social ecological perspective, this project explores intimate partner violence (IPV) in female-on-female relationships, finding that American society’s contradictory views of lesbian relationships as a beacon of equality and as a deviant relationship dynamic, work to silence victims and perpetuate abuse. Through in-depth interviews with eight participants, six of whom have been victims of abuse in female-on-female relationships, I explore the relationship between IPV and four social levels: the individual, the relationship, the local gay community, and dominant heteronormative society. These four levels overlap with one another, silencing lesbian IPV victims who have difficulty finding supportive groups with whom they can share their stories. Similarly, the female victim-male abuser dichotomy most readily recognized within American society makes it difficult for lesbians who experience IPV to conceptualize themselves as true victims. Rather than apply the standard lenses of gender or conflict theories, I utilize the social ecological perspective, which allows for a more nuanced view of IPV that explains the phenomenon as more than male attempts to maintain dominance over their female partners.

  • Thumbnail for People in Agriculture: The Intersection of Work, Gender, and Burnout in Organic Agriculture
    People in Agriculture: The Intersection of Work, Gender, and Burnout in Organic Agriculture by Brachtenbach, Emma

    The field of small-scale agriculture in the United States has become an outlet for women who growers to have a “place at the table” in a traditionally male dominated space. There has been research done regarding the ways in which agriculture has given women a space to nurture themselves, their passions, and their communities through food. The small-scale agriculture has also become a place for consumers to reconnect with their food production. The qualitative, ethnographic data was collected through participant observation and interviews at one agricultural site in northern Colorado. This research focused on the ways in women, at one agricultural site, who are growers, both seasonal and professionally, manage the traditionally male occupation, care work associated with increased face-to-face contact with customers, identity management, and physical markers of manual labor. The results of this research indicate that women working in agriculture are often forced to manage their identities as women who do manual labor as well has engage in care work. The care work took several forms and varied between seasonal farm workers and professional farmers. The results of this research also indicated that burnout was experienced by seasonal and professional farmers in different ways; emotional, physical, or a combination of both.

  • Thumbnail for The Strong Black Woman Schema: A Cultural Contributor to Depression
    The Strong Black Woman Schema: A Cultural Contributor to Depression by Jackson-Bartelmus, Zora

    Black women in American society hold the disadvantaged social positioning of intersecting oppressions that stem from gender, race and often class. This has consequences as this population demonstrates a wide variety of negative health outcomes that are not seen in other such marginalized groups. Using the social determinants of health theoretical framework to help shed light on the fundamental causes of negative health outcomes that fall along the lines of race, gender, and socioeconomic status, this study looks at the role of the Strong Black Woman Schema on Black women’s mental health. This stereotype, to the extent that it is adopted, binds these women to the confines of emotional invulnerability, self-reliance, self-sacrifice, and caretaking, causing them to neglect their own needs and exacerbating negative health outcomes. This schema, when compared to the other more explicitly denigrating stereotypes of Black women, is perceived as laudable and as the only avenue to their respectability. I argue that this factor, the Strong Black Woman schema, or SBW, when internalized, acts as a cultural mechanism through which stress becomes embodied as the symbol of strength and will be associated with heightened prevalence of depressive symptoms. Using an online survey, 110 self-identifying Black women attending four-year undergraduate colleges and universities across the country were recruited via purposive sampling, given the targeted population of concern. Findings showed that variation in depression scores in young Black women can be partially explained by the internalization of the SBW schema, and that the internalization of this schema is associated with income and one’s level of religiosity.

  • Thumbnail for “It’s Not Just a Story We’re Telling”: How the Oil and Gas Industry Rationalize Fracking’s Safety
    “It’s Not Just a Story We’re Telling”: How the Oil and Gas Industry Rationalize Fracking’s Safety by Lerer, Katie

    This paper examines the willingness of industry personnel and anti-fracking protester (fractivists) to engage in conversation about fracking in urban landscapes. Increasingly, fracking sites are situated in urban communities, near homes, schools, and playgrounds, leaving community members concerned and apprehensive about fracking's effects on the environment and human health. In response, the oil and gas industry promotes and encourages “authentic and transparent engagement with community members” in order to to assuage public fears. Using interview data, this study analyzes what frames of understanding industry personnel and fractivists see fracking through, how the frames prevent conversations, and how a frame that prioritizes a cost-benefit analysis benefits mineral extraction throughout Colorado and belittles community members lived experiences.