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Hiroshima: Sadako Sasaki's Paper Cranes.

Abstract

These origami paper cranes were among those distributed at her funeral. In a story now known worldwide by millions of school children, Sadako Sasaki was exposed to the atomic bomb as an infant of two years age. She appeared to have escaped harm from the exposure, until ten years later, when, in her sixth year in elementary school, she suddenly became ill with leukemia. She was hospitalized and fought for her life for eight months, before succumbing to the leukemia. During her illness, she continually folded paper cranes, believing that they would help her to recover, and the paper cranes have come to be a symbol of both tragedy and hope. Sadako's death gave birth to a movement to erect a monument in the Peace Park to all of the children who perished in the A-bomb explosion.

Note

May be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement to be given to IDEAS project, Earlham College, and the Peace Memorial Museum of Hiroshima.

Administrative Notes

May be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only, in accordance with Fair Use policies. Acknowledgement to be given to IDEAS project, Earlham College, and the Peace Memorial Museum of Hiroshima.

Copyright
Copyright restrictions apply.
Publisher
Earlham College
PID
coccc:22899
Extent
1402 w. x 1125 h., 150 ppi