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  • Thumbnail for A Religious Procession
    A Religious Procession

    Rajasthani school; enamel on oil cloth or canvas. 12.25†x 12.75â€. Purchased in Jaipur, India.

  • Thumbnail for A Royal Woman Dressing with Five Maid Servants in Attendance
    A Royal Woman Dressing with Five Maid Servants in Attendance by Unknown

    Paint on paper; 5 1/2 x 3 7/16 inches.

  • Thumbnail for A celebrate the Hungry Ghost Festival sign
    A celebrate the Hungry Ghost Festival sign

    A celebrate the Hungry Ghost Festival sign

  • Thumbnail for A classic altar for the deities
    A classic altar for the deities

    A classic altar for the deities

  • Thumbnail for A courtesan reading a latter beside a paper lantern-parody of Omu Komachi (Parrot Komachi)
    A courtesan reading a latter beside a paper lantern-parody of Omu Komachi (Parrot Komachi) by Eisen Keisai

    From the Nana Komachi (Seven Komachi) series. Keisei Eisen was born in Edo, the son of a calligraphy artist. He was apprenticed to Kikugawa Eizan and studied traditional painting before becoming a printmaker. Throughout his career, Eisen’s work was productive and varied. Book illustrations and prints were his first commissioned works. Early on, he achieved lasting fame for his bijin-ga (pictures of beautiful women), and both contributed to and edited the Ukiyo-e ruiko (History of Prints of the Floating World) one of the few surviving sources of information-rich material on printmaking art and artists in Japan. At times, he struck partnerships with other artists of his age, such as his collaboration with Hiroshige, which resulted in a series of landscape prints entitled The Sixty-nine Stations on the Kiso Highway. Eisen also released many surimono (privately issued prints), shunga (erotic prints), and some landscape pieces. In addition to his career as a printmaker, Eisen pursued other sources of income. A self-described hard-drinker who humbly titled his version of Japanese print history Mumeio zhuihitsu (Essays by a Nameless Old Man), Eisen was also the manager and proprietor of a brothel for a time. Today, however he is most famous for his portrayals of the beauties of old Japan. The traditional Nana Komachi was a group of stories concerning the mid ninth century poetess Ono no Komachi, one of the six poetic geniuses and thirty-six immortal poets. During the Edo period, however Komachi became a sobriquet of many beautiful women and nana komachi was also used for other bijin-ga series of a variety of seven beauties.

  • Thumbnail for A mother seated and reading a letter while her daughter combs her hair
    A mother seated and reading a letter while her daughter combs her hair by Utamaro Kitagawa

    The dominant ukiyo-e artist of the late 18th century, Utamaro is as famous for his legendary life as for his unsurpassed images of courtesans and famous beauties of his day. Bijin-ga (images of beauties) might be of actual contemporary and historic women or of an idealized type of beauty specific to a time and region. Courtesans in particular were usually depicted in the latest and most elaborate fashions of the day. After restrictive censorship laws were passed in the 1840s, many artists turned to generalized pictures of the latest fashions and more domestic settings for their images of beauties. Even in domestic settings many of Utamaro’s prints have a strong element of the erotic.

  • Thumbnail for A newer family grave site on path to Okunoin
  • Thumbnail for A qingbai (bluish white) bowl with an unglazed rim and moulded overlapping lotus petal patterns
    A qingbai (bluish white) bowl with an unglazed rim and moulded overlapping lotus petal patterns

    This bowl has a wide unglazed rim, a flaring mouth and a footring. Its exterior and interior as well as the base of the footring are in a bluish white glaze. According to its glaze color, this bowl is categorized as qingbai (bluish white) ware. Such a typical glaze tone was produced as a natural result of reduction firing in a wood-fired kiln, which was the most straightforward method for potters working in south China. Overall the glazing appears quite even and smooth. The unglazed rim, exposing the thin and finely wheeled buff body, demonstrates that this bowl was produced through a technique of firing called fushao (the rim-down firing). Fushao was firstly adopted at the northern Ding kilns in Hebei province during the mid-Northern Song period and then influenced the way of firing qingbai ware in the south. It is highly likely that this object was invented, perfected and manufactured in large quatities during both Northern and Southern Song periods.

  • Thumbnail for A street in Chinatown
    A street in Chinatown

    On a street in Chinatown decorated with lanterns.

  • Thumbnail for A street view
    A street view

    A view of older housing complexes from the street.

  • Thumbnail for ATM
    ATM

    A complex machine, designed to give you money.

  • Thumbnail for ATM, close-up 1
    ATM, close-up 1

    A closer look at a Japanese ATM.

  • Thumbnail for ATM, close-up 2
    ATM, close-up 2

    A closer look at a Japanese ATM.

  • Thumbnail for Actor Ichikawa Komazo as a Samurai
    Actor Ichikawa Komazo as a Samurai by Katsukawa Shunko (1743-1812)

    image size: 11.75" x 5.25". Woodblock print in ink and colors on paper. Condition is very faded; framed behind glass. Vertical hosoban size. This print comes from a group of six prints of similar style and size, all acquired from T.Z. Shiota in San Francisco between 1961 and 1966. They all portray famous Kabuki actors in roles from Kabuki plays. This print is distinguished from the others because impressed on its surface is a round red seal reading "Hayashi Tada," which is the seal of one of the earliest Japanese Ukiyo-e print dealers to sell prints in Paris, Hayashi Tadamasa (1853-1906).

  • Thumbnail for Actor on Walkway; Scene from Chikubushima play
    Actor on Walkway; Scene from Chikubushima play by Kogyo, Tsukioka

    Actor in elaborate costume and mask with long red hair. Published by Matsuki Heikichi. Color woodblock print. Color woodblock print; 9†x 14â€.

  • Thumbnail for Adam and Eve
    Adam and Eve by Sadao Watanabe (1913-1996)

    Kappazuri or katazome dyed stencil print, 16/100, 27 x 20 inches. Watanabe is, perhaps, the most famous Christian-Japanese print master to date. Frances Blakemore states that: "Watanabe's works are in collections from South Africa to Australia, from the Philippines to Europe. (Who's who in Modern Japanese Prints, p. 228). Institutions that list examples of his work in their collections include the Museums of Modern Art of Tokyo and New York, the Honolulu Academy of Arts, the British Museum, and the Haifa Museum. Ten of Watanabe's prints are on permanent display in the Vatican Museum of Modern Art. Watanabe also has had shows of his prints in the US, Japan, Brussels, the Netherlands, China, Germany, Denmark, and Indonesia. His work was included into the exhibition of Japanese prints at the Winter Olympics in Sapporo in 1972. Watanabe has won the prizes of the Folk Art Museum, the Japanese Print Association, and other prestigious bodies. He is holder of the coveted prize of the Kokuga sosaku kyokai, the organization that holds the Arts in Spring-Kokuten Exhibition that is such an important event in the world of modern art in Japan.

  • Thumbnail for Admission: $1.00
    Admission: $1.00

    Flyer advertising a grand matinee was held to honor members of the Japanese mission during their stay in New York.

  • Thumbnail for Advertising Along the Huangpu
    Advertising Along the Huangpu

    View of some of the tall buildings and advertisements along Shanghai's Huangpu river, glimpsed through the perpetual Shanghai haze.

  • Thumbnail for After Hiroshige, front view stage 1
    After Hiroshige, front view stage 1 by unknown

    One of nineteen prints which illustrate the process of making a multi-block multicolor woodblock print.The print reproduced is the view of Asakusa Kinryuzan (Asakusa Kannon Temple) from Ando Hiroshige’s Toto yukimi hakkei (Eight Views of Snow in the Eastern Capital).

  • Thumbnail for After Hiroshige, front view stage 10
    After Hiroshige, front view stage 10 by unknown

    One of nineteen prints which illustrate the process of making a multi-block multicolor woodblock print. The print reproduced is the view of Asakusa Kinryuzan (Asakusa Kannon Temple) from Ando Hiroshige’s Toto yukimi hakkei (Eight Views of Snow in the Eastern Capital).

  • Thumbnail for After Hiroshige, front view stage 11
    After Hiroshige, front view stage 11 by unknown

    One of nineteen prints which illustrate the process of making a multi-block multicolor woodblock print. The print reproduced is the view of Asakusa Kinryuzan (Asakusa Kannon Temple) from Ando Hiroshige’s Toto yukimi hakkei (Eight Views of Snow in the Eastern Capital).

  • Thumbnail for After Hiroshige, front view stage 12
    After Hiroshige, front view stage 12 by unknown

    One of nineteen prints which illustrate the process of making a multi-block multicolor woodblock print.The print reproduced is the view of Asakusa Kinryuzan (Asakusa Kannon Temple) from Ando Hiroshige’s Toto yukimi hakkei (Eight Views of Snow in the Eastern Capital).

  • Thumbnail for After Hiroshige, front view stage 13
    After Hiroshige, front view stage 13 by unknown

    One of nineteen prints which illustrate the process of making a multi-block multicolor woodblock print.The print reproduced is the view of Asakusa Kinryuzan (Asakusa Kannon Temple) from Ando Hiroshige’s Toto yukimi hakkei (Eight Views of Snow in the Eastern Capital).

  • Thumbnail for After Hiroshige, front view stage 14
    After Hiroshige, front view stage 14 by unknown

    One of nineteen prints which illustrate the process of making a multi-block multicolor woodblock print.The print reproduced is the view of Asakusa Kinryuzan (Asakusa Kannon Temple) from Ando Hiroshige’s Toto yukimi hakkei (Eight Views of Snow in the Eastern Capital).

  • Thumbnail for After Hiroshige, front view stage 15
    After Hiroshige, front view stage 15 by unknown

    One of nineteen prints which illustrate the process of making a multi-block multicolor One of nineteen prints which illustrate the process of making a multi-block multicolor woodblock print.The print reproduced is the view of Asakusa Kinryuzan (Asakusa Kannon Temple) from Ando Hiroshige’s Toto yukimi hakkei (Eight Views of Snow in the Eastern Capital).