Colorado College Logo

  DigitalCC

Use AND (in capitals) to search multiple keywords.
Example: harmonica AND cobos

2012 v. 4 no. 1

7 hits

  • Thumbnail for Analyzing La Cuna : new approaches for mentoring in professional associations
    Analyzing La Cuna : new approaches for mentoring in professional associations by Hicks, Alison

    This case study explores the implementation of La Cuna, an online mentoring forum in a small, subject-based professional association, the Seminar for the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (SALALM). Designed using the social network software Ning, the forum functioned as an informal learning community for 38 members and was an innovative response to geographical challenges and changing technological skills. Using participation data and a questionnaire to analyze the implementation and development of the hybrid e-mentoring community, this study reveals challenges and benefits that should be considered when managing similar professional development activities. While the forum failed to maintain sustained participation, findings revealed the need to assess professional association member needs regularly and highlighted the importance of continued exploration of online learning tools. Through the description of this project, professional associations and other learning communities will gain insights into the creation and implementation of an online e-mentoring learning community, which will be useful as librarians and groups attempt to meet member professional development needs.

  • Thumbnail for Improving the effectiveness of librarian-faculty collaboration on library collection development
    Improving the effectiveness of librarian-faculty collaboration on library collection development by Shen, Lan

    Librarian-faculty relations are essential to library collection development. This paper discusses, first of all, the reasons for the customary disconnect between librarians and faculty in light of their different priorities, visions, expertise, and status. In an attempt to bridge the librarian-faculty separation, a horizontal strategy is proposed focusing on financial collaborations between the library and other academic departments on campus, such as adopting the balanced budget, fair and rotated resource allocation, and prioritized investment through providing a General Reserve Fund. A vertical strategy is also proposed defined as an organizational and professional partnership through three different vertical levels, namely, the university, unit (department/program), and individual levels. At the university level, while the collaboration needs to cover the areas of book selection, evaluation, preservation, weeding, and cancellation, it should also rely on campus-wide workshops as an effective way of improving collection development and professional training. At the unit level, in addition to the department liaison model, it is advisable to organize specific forums focusing on the special needs required by different academic programs and departments. Individual level collaboration is critical to achieving the proposed goals as all institutional strategies must rely on individual efforts. Librarians should provide individual, informal, and customized outreach services.

  • Thumbnail for Knowledge sharing through MS SharePoint
    Knowledge sharing through MS SharePoint by Weldon, Lorette S. J.

    Microsoft SharePoint is being used in government, private, public and association offices throughout the United States. SharePoint was created to increase accountability for projects within a team environment. How could SharePoint help increase accountability in information management? This article will review SharePoint’s positive and negative characteristics in the hopes of helping information professionals understand what SharePoint really is in the information world and how it can be applied to libraries and other information management organizations.

  • Thumbnail for Milestones in collaboration
    Milestones in collaboration by Gaetz, Ivan

    With this issue, Collaborative Librarianship begins its fourth year of publication. The reasons for beginning the Journal continue to be relevant today, and perhaps even more compelling. In the time leading up to volume 1, number 1, (January 2009), we recognized that collaboration is a fundamental value in the practice of librarianship and that it takes many forms, from in-house to consortia cooperatives and beyond.

  • Thumbnail for NISO and collaboration : a place at the table for all players
    NISO and collaboration : a place at the table for all players by Horton, Valerie , Carpenter, Todd

    Todd Carpenter, the Managing Director of NISO, the National Information Standards Organization, is a leading player in promoting research through the creation of standard and best practices related to information exchange and management. NISO provides the environment for bringing key organizations together to reach complex and often difficult agreements. As Carpenter says, “One of NISO’s most important principles is ensuring all the relevant players have an opportunity to sit at the table, in an open and fostering environment that is supported by participatory and well-established rules for engagement.” This interview is part of a series of conversations with members of Collaborative Librarianship’s Advisory Board.

  • Thumbnail for Review : Collaboration is key : librarians and composition instructors analyze student research and writing
    Review : Collaboration is key : librarians and composition instructors analyze student research and writing by Wheatwind, Marie-Elise

    Marie-Elise Wheatwind reviews the article, "Collaboration is Key: Librarians and Composition Instructors Analyze Student Research and Writing." This article, a collaboration between University of Georgia (UGA) composition instructors and librarians, Caroline Cason Barratt, Kristin Nielsen, Christy Desmet, and Ron Balthazor. The article presents an analysis of citation patterns from students in their First-year Composition Program (FYC).

  • Thumbnail for Review : The social factor : innovate, ignite, and win through mass collaboration and social networking
    Review : The social factor : innovate, ignite, and win through mass collaboration and social networking by Lakatos, Holly

    Holly Lakotos reviews the book, "The Social Factor: Innovate, Ignite, and Win through Mass Collaboration and Social Networking." This book written by Maria Azua, IBM's vice president of Cloud Computing Enablement, seeks to demystify these tools and other social networking applications. Although the work purports to describe “how to choose and implement the right social networking solutions” in reality, it is an introduction to social networking concepts that may help librarians improve information literacy efforts across all patron groups.